Congress, not presidential proclamation, should establish national parks

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This summer, the National Park Service (NPS) celebrated its 103rd anniversary. The NPS, the leading agency responsible for maintaining national parks and monuments, remains popular among the general public. Yet, the reservation of public lands is not without controversy, especially when it comes to national monuments.

One key difference between national parks and national monuments is how they are created. National parks can only be established by an act of Congress. Monuments, on the other hand, are established by presidential proclamation.

The power to establish monuments comes from the Antiquities Act of 1906. The original purpose of the Antiquities Act, as its name suggests, was to allow the president to quickly protect antiquities and other historic objects from looters.

NPS, National Park Service

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Electric Bicycle use on Public Lands Increasing

Department of the Interior Pushes to Increase Access and Recreational Opportunities for Electric Bicycle Use on Public Lands

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WASHINGTON (Oct 22, 2019) – Today, the Department of the Interior (DOI) announced its guidance to implement Secretary’s Order 3376, Increasing Recreational Opportunities Through the Use of Electric Bikes, which will allow the use of low-speed electric bicycles (e-bikes) at national wildlife refuges and other DOI-managed public lands where traditional biking occurs, expanding recreational opportunities and access to millions of Americans. The National Park Service (NPS) has previously issued guidance to allow for e-bikes to be used on most bike paths in the national parks.

Secretary’s Order 3376, signed by U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt on August 29, directs DOI bureaus to create a clear and consistent e-bike policy for the lands they manage. The policy also supports Secretary’s Order 3366 to increase recreational opportunities on public lands.

Public Lands, e-bikes

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Five New States Commit to Outdoor Recreation Principles

Signatories to Confluence Accords Reach a Historic 13

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The Outdoor Recreation Roundtable (ORR) – the nation’s leading coalition of outdoor recreation trade associations with 29 members serving more than 100,000 businesses – joined outdoor recreation leaders from Maine, Michigan,Nevada, New Mexico and Virginia as they committed to advance the principles contained in the Outdoor Recreation Industry Confluence Accords on behalf of their governors. ORR is a founding sponsor of the National Governors Association (NGA) Outdoor Recreation Learning Network. Today’s signing ceremony brings the total number of states committed to the four pillars of the accords (conservation and stewardship, education and workforce training, economic development, and public health and wellness) to a historic 13. There are also 16 states with Offices of Outdoor Recreation or task forces created or in development.

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Interior Department Supported $315 Billion in Economic Activity and 1.8 Million Jobs in FY 2018

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WASHINGTON (Oct 15, 2019)–– U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt today released the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Economic Report for Fiscal Year 2018. The report highlights Interior activities covering conventional and renewable energy, recreation, non-fuel minerals, irrigation, and conservation that resulted in $315 billion in economic output and supported 1.8 million jobs during the year – up from $254 billion in economic output and 1.6 million jobs in 2016.

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State Works to Reduce Traffic Collisions with Wildlife

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Mule deer use an overpass with fencing created to direct
them over the road safely. (Nevada Department of Wildlife)

CARSON CITY, Nev. — Animals in the road cause an average of 500 traffic collisions a year in Nevada - which is why experts on wildlife, transportation and development are meeting for a summit today at the Governor's Mansion in Carson City. 

Each year, those collisions kill one or two people and cost taxpayers between $19 million and $22 million. Brian Wakeling, administrator for the game division of the Nevada Department of Wildlife, said underpasses and overpasses built to allow safe wildlife crossings make a huge difference for species such as elk, mule deer, wild horses, bighorn sheep, bears and the desert tortoise.

wildlife, Nevada

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